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 ** Vaccinations

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*Janet*
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PostSubject: ** Vaccinations   Tue Aug 05, 2014 7:32 pm

Preventive vaccination against several infectious canine diseases must be part of your schnauzer's early life with you. Since the antibodies that your puppy acquired from its previously immunized mother slowly diminish, at about 8 weeks of age.

The common diseases which puppies receive vaccinations for are canine distemper, infectious canine hepatitis, canine parvovirus, canine coronavirus, parainfluenza, leptospirosis, and rabies, (but beware, any dog under 20 lbs often has a reaction to the lepto shots). My Max had a reaction, for 3 days he crawled on the floor, itching....he was prescribed benedryl to counter the side effects.



Canine distemper

Canine distemper is a characterized by a large number of signs and symptoms:

Early on, the dog runs a temperature of 103.5 to 105.5 degrees. It will soon drop, only to rise again a day later.

Typical signs are exhaustion, vomiting, diarrhea, tonsillitis, coughing, mucus laden discharge for the nose and eyes, hardening of the foot, toe and nose pads, and central nervous system disorder ranging from minor nervous tics to major convulsions.

The virus of canine distemper is spread from dog to dog via eating, drinking, or inhaling the infective materials in mucous secretions, vomitus, or stools. The virus may be spread by humans that have handled sick dogs shedding the virus. Infective virus may also be carried on the shoes of people who have walked where and infected dog has discharged the contents of its stomach, intestines, or musus from its lungs.

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PostSubject: **Canine hepatitis   Tue Aug 05, 2014 7:36 pm

The virus of infectious canine hepatitis isn't infectious for humans and is unrelated to infectious hepatitis in people. The physical signs of infectious canine hepatitis are fatigue, tonsillitis, loss of appetite, fever, vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. Often if there is substantial liver damage, the whites of the dog's eyes may change to bright yellow.

If the dog survives for several weeks, its corneas may become cloudy and milky blue-white; this alteration lasts for a week or so then slowly returns to normal. This disease is spread through the urine and feces of infected dogs.

The death rate is 60% in unvaccinated puppies.

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PostSubject: **Coronavirus   Tue Aug 05, 2014 7:40 pm

The symptoms of coronavirus are very similar to parvo. This disease is much milder and less deadly.

Some dogs become severely ill and may even die from this condition but these are unusual. The major sign of the infection in puppies and young dogs are a sudden onset of vomiting and diarrhea, loss of appetite, dehydration, and a mild fever.

The duration of this disease is 7-10 days.

The diarrhea will be yellow-orange....and occasionally bloody.
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PostSubject: Re: ** Vaccinations   Tue Aug 05, 2014 7:44 pm

Kennel Cough

Although not life threatening these disorders are unpleasant for the affected dogs, and because of the almost constant and often protracted coughing, are very annoying for the dog's owner. The coughing can usually be controlled with anti cough medications prescribed by a vet.

Parainfluenza (kennel cough), is spread from one dog to others by contact of unvaccinated dogs with the coughed-up mucus and other wastes from carrier canines. Humans can also carry the virus on their clothing and shoes.

Proper vaccinating is effective in protecting dogs from kennel cough.
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PostSubject: Re: ** Vaccinations   Tue Aug 05, 2014 7:54 pm

Leptospirosis

Unlike the other prevalent infectious diseases of dogs, which are viral, leptospirosis is a bacterial infection common to may species of mammals, including humans. Ordinarily the leptospiral bacteria are shed in the urine of carrier animals, and infection occurs when susceptible dogs are exposed to that urine. Even dogs that recovered several months earlier from active leptospirosis can continue to act as carriers of the disease to unvaccinated dogs.

Humans can also be infected.

Strict hygiene is essential when dealing with a proven case of leptospirosis. Wash hands carefully, use disposable food and water bowls, and household bleach disinfection of all surfaces that were in contact with urine, vomitus, or stools.

The signs of the acute phase of leptospirosis may mimic those of both canine distemper and infectious canine hepatitis: fatigue, loss of appetite, fever, tonsillitis, ocular or nasal discharge, vomiting, abdominal pain and muscular pain. The white portion of the eyes may become yellow, as they do with infectious canine hepatitis, and in sever cases the skin and gums may become yellowish.

Antibiotics will be prescribed and the dog will recover.

Now as I mentioned above. Many small breed dogs, mainly under 20 pounds most often have reactions to this vaccination.
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PostSubject: Re: ** Vaccinations   Tue Aug 05, 2014 8:00 pm

Rabies

Many species of wildlife, such as bats, skunks, foxes, raccoons, and feral cats and dogs serve natural reservoirs of the virus. Rabies is deadly. Therefore, your dog must be vaccinated at 4-6 months of age depending on the state you live in.

Rabies in dogs may take either of 2 forms: in the furious form, the dog is extremely aggressive and often attacks other animals, humans, or even inanimate objects. In the dumb form the dog becomes extremely lethargic and gradually lapses into torpor. In either case, there is a great tendency for the infected victim to avoid water; hence the common term for the disease: hydrophobia.

One is infected when the saliva from either form of the rabid animal enters an open skin wound.
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